The power and essence of the Hawaiian culture is visually captured in these images by Penny Bauer and the words of chants by Poni Kamau'u in the film Nā Makana - The Gifts, also featuring authentic Hawaiian musical instruments.

Penny has captured the depth and beauty of these Hawaiian Gifts

Included with Film
A Guidance Card

written by
Mākela M. Bruno-Kidani
Instructor, Hawaiian Language and Studies, University of Hawaii at Hilo, 
Former Director, Pūnana Leo O Waimea
The poetic essence of the Hawaiian language lives in its mystical hidden meanings. This magical poetry is visually captured for you in the images by Penny Bauer and the words of chants by Poni Kamau'u  in the film Nā Makana.

This Guidance card provides several key words that share an aspect of the Hawaiian culture, with definitions in their simplest form. Questions provide an opportunity for exploring the role of these teachings in your life. You can take in each word as you view the images and hear the chants, and see what story unfolds for you.

E mālama i ke ao honua

Let us care for our environment

Caring for growing things provides us with resources for the present. We are connected to those who did this before us and leave a legacy for those who are to follow.

Roen M. Hufford
Master Lei Maker

I le‘a ka hula i ka ho‘opa‘a

Hula is pleasing because of the drummer

The Hula is our history. The spirits of our ancestors are with us when we are dancing, chanting and drumming. All is remembered in our dances and chants. Working together with great focus, Hula dancers and chanters and drummers are strengthened by each other and all is pono, right.

Kumu Hula Ehulani Stephany, Hālau Hula Ka Makani Hali ‘Ala o Puna

“E lu‘u i ka hana”

Dive into the work

Apply yourself fully. While carving, I find myself deeply connected to my culture. The art of carving and reproducing ancient images opens deep insights into what is conveyed by my artisan ancestors. I am grateful to share this with others. 

Keola Sequeira, Kahuna Kālai Ki‘i,
Master of Image Carving

Nānā ka maka, ho‘olohe ka pepeiao, pa‘a ka waha

Watch with the eyes, listen with the ears, close the mouth

I have passed on the knowledge I have of my Hawaiian culture to my children and grandchildren, as it will help them to identify who they are and the responsibility they have in the world we live in.

Solomon  K. Apio, Master Stone and Wood Carver

Ua ka ua, ola ka nohona
o ka ‘āina kula

The rain pours,
life comes to the plains

As rain gives life to the earth, language gives life to the culture. Teaching the Hawaiian language to all ages is a gift that I both give and receive with aloha in perpetuation of the Hawaiian culture.

Mākela Bruno-Kidani, Instructor, Hawaiian Language and Studies, University of Hawaii at Hilo,  Former Director, Pūnana Leo o Waimea

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